Biology at Lake Tahoe

UC Davis lake research examines a variety of species in the Lake Tahoe Basin including regular monitoring of primary productivity algal growth, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and attached algae (periphyton). Research is also being conducted on several aquatic invasive species including Asian clams, Curlyleaf pondweed, and Mysis shrimp. Outside of the lake experiments have been established by researchers from UC Davis and the USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Research Station to evaluate ecologically important plant traits in dominant tree species in the Lake Tahoe Basin.

Research Projects

ALGAE


Anecdotal data suggests that there used to be extremely low attached algae levels on Lake Tahoe's shoreline. There was also likely more rooted plants, such as tulles and ...more

ASIAN CLAMS IN EMERALD BAY

Low Densities of non-native Asian clams were discovered on the sandy sill entrance of Emerald Bay in 2010. Asian clams compete with native species for resources and...more

PERIPHYTON MONITORING

Researchers from TERC monitor levels of attached algae (periphyton) growth around the lake five times per year. Periphyton is collected from submerged rocks at 9 routine sites while snorkeling...more

FOREST RESEARCH

Our lab group broadly focuses on forest ecology, conservation, ecological genetics, species restoration, and understanding the role and interaction of diseases, insects, fire, drought, and historical disturbances (e.g., fire exclusion...more

PHYTOPLANKTON IN LAKE TAHOE

Phytoplankton are photosynthetic plant cells which spend their life cycle in the pelagic.  Mostly single cells, and visible microscopically, these plants are central to understanding any biological ecosystems in the lake.  As the primary producers...more

ZOOPLANKTON IN LAKE TAHOE
Zooplankton are tiny creatures that live in bodies of water and play an important role in the food chain by effecting organisms both above (fish) and below (algae) them through...more